Theme: Renaissance Agglomeration – Housing in Munich Moosach

Team: Laura Eberhardt + Vanessa Salm


In collaboration with Guest Professors Studio Lütjens + Padmanabhan at the Technical University Munich.


all images: © 2016 Vanessa Salm, Laura Eberhardt

The architecture of the Italian Renaissance is an architecture of unfinished individual buildings and magnificent urban fragments. Often with modest means, the Renaissance architects created works that have not lost their expressiveness to this day. Renaissance buildings draw their strength from the tension and resistance of a work that allows ideal and reality, imagination and contradiction, ruthlessness and adaptation in equal measure. In this semester, the task was to design residential buildings in the Munich conurbation.

The Munich agglomeration is determined by the models of the post-war period, the greened-out settlements and the single-family house areas.
The transformation of these agglomeration areas into urban districts is one of the important tasks for the coming years. Moosach in the north of Munich and the possibility of its urbanization is the theme here. The result is a multi-storey urban residential building.

The total volume is built up on the back of a residential development in Dachauerstraße and is limited to Gubenstraße. The silhouette is already visible from the main street and offers passers-by a glimpse of the residential building.

 

The volume consists of a grouping of several bodies, which are joined together by a continuous band of plinths. These bodies have been processed in such a way that they become their own characters through individual features, which in turn take up a reference to each other through commonalities and are finally read as a whole. The aim here was to create moments of tension; for example, the bevelled corner of one volume exposes the row of windows of the next body.

The façade deals intensively with the duality of surface or the massive body and the openings, which in turn represent a surface in themselves. Different sized openings were designed based on the „almost-square“. The choice and setting of the respective windows was intended to support their respective character. The same applies to the facades with pigmented concrete blocks.

 

The ground floor and the staircases are accessed via the inner courtyard, which is formed by the three bodies.

 

Similar to the concept of the façade, the interior follows the principle of the „almost-square“ and offers a sequence of open and closed spaces, which are characterised by features such as the bevelled corner or barely noticeable connections. The division of the rooms, as well as their raw materiality and open appearance, should allow the occupant to develop freely.

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